Who am I and what on Earth is this?!

Katie Featherstone Feathery Travels budget travel blog

 

You seem to have found yourself on "Feathery Travels". My name is Katie Featherstone and sometimes I go places. Often I stay longer than originally planned.

 

After falling down a black hole into the refugee crisis for nearly half of 2016, Dan and I escaped with the remainder of our sanity in our van "Burt" to recover. Through several strokes of luck and kindness, we found Summer jobs in the Fjallabak nature reserve in Iceland; that has allowed us to maintain this slow, travelling lifestyle much longer than expected.

 

I am updating snippets more regularly from here and slowly trying to piece together the rest of my words.

 


Practical Information - Gambia/Senegal Border Crossing (Amdallai/Karang)

Attaya Gambia Senegal
A somewhat unrelated photo of Gambian attaya making paraphernalia.

 

From Fass to Amdallai (The Gambia), the border crossing to Karang (Senegal), changing money and onward travel to Dakar/elsewhere.

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From Bwiam to Basse, but mostly around Janjanbureh, then back west along the North Bank - The Gambia

River Gambia boat trip Janjanbureh
Part of the River Gambia - near Janjanbureh

 

Travel onward from Bwiam was hot and mildly confusing. Initially we caught a big bus to Soma. Out of the window, what limited modernity we had become accustomed to dropped away; roofs changed to thatch and houses shrunk, men began to wear robes more commonly than t-shirts and horse carts soon outnumbered private vehicles. Soma was predominantly a busy intersection, swirling with dust and criss-crossed by semi-panicked donkeys. We went to check the bank for an ATM and were greeted by a nervous, armed security guard, his finger on the trigger, who seemed eager for us to leave. It was much more confusing than threatening. We quickly found a gelly-gelly bound for Janjanbureh.

 

At any given time, it is rare to be further than thirty centimetres away from a baby on public transport. We provided in-transit entertainment or sometimes accidental terror. Up until that day we had found travel to be quite fun, but the novelty wore off as we waited for the minibus to fill up; trundled off after a bump start (nearly leaving Dan behind); and proceeded to stop what felt like one hundred times, once for as long as an hour, over as many kilometres. To the other passengers dismay (and our confusion) merely a tenth of the journey away from Janjanbureh, we were turfed out of that bus and onto another. Then we waited for that one to fill up. All in all, one hundred and eighty kilometers from Bwiam to Janjanbureh took us seven and a half hours. Dan was getting an increasingly bad back and upon arrival, we accidentally paid one hundred dalasi instead of ten for the five minute ferry crossing across the river Gambia. Finally, we arrived on the north bank dispirited, dirty and on the verge of heat stroke. 

 

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Slowly, slowly up the river Gambia - from Sanyang to Bwiam.

Bwiam, Gambia
Bwiam - "a big town"

 

We lingered in Sanyang, nervous of our next step, hiding amongst other tourists we didn't even like to avoid the unknown quantity that was public transport. There is limited information about this sort of travel within The Gambia; no such thing as bus times, numbered stands or labelled destinations. What hints I could find were so vague that I could have assumed them. Unable to delay any further*, we set out early one morning to walk the few dusty kilometres into Sanyang town.

 

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Tumani Tenda - The Gambia

Senegalese Thick-knee and mangrove - Tumani Tenda -Gambia
Senegalese Thick-knee

 

Staying there for nearly a week in the end, I have struggled to put my experience of Tumani Tenda into a digestible format.  As is so often the case, the atmosphere was made by the wonderful staff, so I am trying to do them justice. 

 

For learning about life in a Gambian village, about sustainable farming or for bird watching, it's hard to imagine a more ideal set up. The prices are listed upon arrival, so there is no need to haggle and activities are very affordable coming from Europe. Most importantly, any profit made is channelled straight back into the community.

 

The following information is enough for the basis of a thesis, so I have broken it up into sections. You might just want to look at the photos...

 

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Rainbow Beach Bar and Lodgings, Sanyang - The Gambia

Sanyang, Gambia - cows on the beach

 

Far from fresh-faced having slept in the airport, but new to The Gambia, we were not looking for a challenge in our first few nights in the country. Avoiding Senegambia, the most popular and notoriously tourist infested strip of beach further north, we found Rainbow Beach Bar and Lodgings by the reliable method of arranging accommodation on booking.com in order of lowest price first...

 

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Wave and Caves in Winter - Gwithian to Perranporth on Cornwall's Coast Path.

Gwithian, Cornwall Coast Path
Gwithian

 

Always fond of Cornwall, but never quite sure where to start, I found myself in Portreath with the sole purpose of buying Dan a new bodyboard. That was the beginning of a series of trips we made in the van.* Dan could play in the surf while I hiked the coast path. Gwithian to Perranporth was hardly a grand epic; I began wherever the surf was good, left Dan in the water and walked for a couple of hours to a designated point where he (and Burt) could pick me up again. Along the way were some of the most incredible places I've ever found in England.

 

I've arranged the segments logically (west to east) for your sanity...

*The now deceased "Burt".

 

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Burnt trees and bumble bees - Spring between Gavião and Belver

 

I'm writing this in the present tense because I can't sleep. Burt [the van] is broken, but we still don't know if this is the end of the road. Hopefully the mechanic will tell us in the morning and the wait, at least, will be over. On life's scale of problems, this is small fry, but I'm not good at waiting.

 

This is now our forth night here in Gavião. I spent the first day moping in the room of our guesthouse; it was raining, but I still should have ventured outside. By yesterday I was already stir crazy; irritable and bored. The sun came out, so I walked out of the village, down the main road, round an empty roundabout and out of sight. The roadside trees, plots of tall cabbage and distant barking dogs did me good. This place didn't even know I was there. I floated loosely through reality like Schrödinger's cat, wondering if I might have disappeared. 

 

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Malhão - the big fishy beach clean.

glass fishing float
Treasure amongst the trash - a glass fishing float.

 

After three weeks of storms and surf, I cruelly dragged Dan away from Sagres. We were going to head north. 

 

 

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Storms, Surf and the Plastic Tide - mostly around Vila do Bispo and Sagres

Sunset Cordoama, Vila do Bispo, Sagres, Portugal - van life
Praia da Cordoama, Vila do Bispo, Portugal

 

Finally free from the English winter, semi-permeated with grey but not entirely swallowed, I [we] fled south. Snow storms descended on northern Europe, clutching after Burt's* exhaust as he valiantly chugged through France; down past the ancient wood-striped houses south of Le Harve, missing a baby boar on the road and all the way to Basque country without even a drop of rain. In the small village Garmarthe, perched low on Pyrenean slopes, we bought cheese from the loft of a sheep barn; bread from bakeries and vegetables from green-grocers, we were determined not to just be a drain on the places we visited this time. 

 

*Burt is the name of our van.

 

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Skeletons and their Shadows.

Iguanodon, Natural History Museum, London
Iguanodon

 

Probably aged seven or eight, the first time I came across a stuffed animal I made my Mum hide it behind the sofa, I wouldn't look at the mummy in the Tutankhamun exhibition (Dorchester, not Egypt) and finding a dead sheep on the beach gave me nightmares. More recently I stopped eating meat for all the sensible environmental reasons, but partly also just so I wouldn't have to think about dead things while I chewed anymore; an ancient building full of them shouldn't have held much appeal...

 

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Why you probably shouldn't hike the West Highland Way in December (but I'm glad we tried anyway).

Rannoch Moor, West Highland Way, snow in December, hiking in winter
Dan battling Rannoch Moor.
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Ewelina Wajgert - Illustrating Trash Hero.

Ocean children's' book illustration, Ewelina Wajgert
- from the Trash Hero book.
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Wind and snow up Harter Fell, the Lake District.

Haweswater from Harter Fell, Lake District, short hike
Haweswater from Harter Fell

 

Despite visiting the Lake District three times on our winding ways up and down from Scotland in the van, I had never walked further into the wild than the banks of Haweswater Reservoir. 

 

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Completing the circle - þórsmörk.

Tindfjöll circle, Thorsmork September, hiking
Tindfjöll

 

It had been five months since we first arrived in þórsmörk. There was nobody there then either; it was a privilege. There were swathes of snow in May, some filling gullies and plenty on the mountain tops. We had it on our tents at one point. The spring flowers, a scattering of yellow and purple, have come and long since fallen to the ground. The birch was golden when we came back, and lime green in parts; yellow leaves decorating the paths.

 

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Photographer Jason Wallien - living and working in Beijing.

night street photography rain Beijing

 

Jason has been living in China for almost as long as I've known him. I don't think he intended to be there for so long, but something about Beijing has obviously reeled him in. I first asked him if he would do an interview for me, about his life there and photography, on the 3rd of January 2015; between the two of us, we have managed to string it out until now... I think it was worth the wait. I particularly love his photos of lights and rain in the darkness and for me, his answers are a rare insight into a idea I once considered for myself. We cannot be everywhere and do everything in the same lifetime, so it's good when our friends can be some places for us. I hope you enjoy the read.

 

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This site is written and edited solely by me (Katie). Please contact me if you find any typos or mistakes!

 

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